National Endowment for the Humanities   Adelphi Univeristy
2020 NEH Summer Institute Opportunity

Worlds in Collision:

Nahua and Spanish Pictorial Histories and Annals in 16th-Century Mexico

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute
for 26 College Faculty participants
to be held at Adelphi University July 19 to August 9, 2020
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Daily Schedule with Readings and Online Resources


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Welcome Letter from Project Directors

Institute Daily Schedule
Institute Visiting Scholars
Intellectual Grounding
Lodging and Institute Stipend
How to Apply
Online Mexican Codices
Contact Us

Project Co-Directors:
Dr. Laraine Fletcher
Adelphi University, Anthropology, emerita,
fletcher@adelphi.edu

Dr. George Scheper
Senior Lecturer, Advanced Academic Programs, The Johns Hopkins University,
gscheper@jhu.edu

Project Manager:
Mary Cortina
Director, Office of Research and Sponsored Programs
cortina@adelphi.edu
     Please note: all Visiting Scholar Seminars are held mornings from 9–11 a.m., and afternoons from 2–4 p.m. In addition, Roundtable Discussions, with a focus on the ways in which seminar information might be used in the classroom, will be convened three times each week, from 11:15–12:15, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, following that morning's seminar. See List of Core Texts below.

Core Required Texts:

I. The following two titles will be supplied to each participant:

Adorno, Rolena, The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative. Yale University Press, 2014.

Hernán Cortés, Letters from Mexico (1519-1526), trans. Anthony Pagden, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1986.

II. The following six titles are to be acquired by participants on their own:

Berdan, Frances, Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge World Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, 2014).

Bernal Díaz del Castillo, The Conquest of New Spain, trans. J.M. Cohen. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1985.

Lockhart, James, ed. and trans. We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. Wipf & Stock Publishers. 1993.

Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, tans. N. Griffen, introd. A. Pagden. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1992

Miguel Leon-Portilla, ed. The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico. Forword by J. Jorge Klor de Alva. Boston: Beacon Press, 1992.

Brian, Amber, B. Benton and P. García Loaeza (eds. and trans.), The Native Conquistador: Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Account of the Conquest of New Spain. Penn State University Press, 2015.

* * * * * * * * *

Note: Other readings on the Daily schedule will be accessible through an e-Reserve Blackboard site for our Summer Scholars. Also, please consult our “Online Mexican Codices” on our Home Page.

DETAILED DAILY SCHEDULE

Sunday, July 19

Day of Participant arrival
Arrival and move into dorm spaces; informal greetings by Project Directors.

WEEK ONE

Monday, July 20

Visiting Scholar: Matthew Restall (Sparks Professor, Colonial Latin American History, Penn State University): the New Conquest History

Morning seminar: New Directions in the Study of the 16th Century Conquest Narrative
Reading:
Matthew Restall, “The New Conquest History,” History Compass 10/2 (2012): 151-160.
Matthew Restall, When Montezuma Met Cortés/ The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History (Harper/Collins, 2018): Prologue, Chaps. 1 & 3.

Afternoon seminar: the Cortés /Moctezuma Encounter
Reading:
Matthew Restall, When Montezuma Met Cortés/ The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History (Harper/Collins, 2018): Prologue, Chaps. 4-7, & Epilogue.

Also:

Consult the Kislak paintings on the Conquest of Mexico at the Library of Congress, at: < https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/exploring-the-early-americas/conquest-of-mexico-paintings.html >.

Tuesday, July 21

Visiting Scholar: Frances F. Berdan (Professor emerita, Anthropology, California State University): Discovering and Interpreting the Aztec World

Morning seminar: the Aztecs as Mesoamericans
Reading:
Frances F. Berdan, Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014): Chaps. 1-2.
Clendinnen, Inga. Aztecs: An Interpretation (Cambridge University Press, 1991): Chap. 2, “Local Perspectives,” pp. 45-83.

Afternoon seminar: Aztec Society and Culture
Reading:
Frances F. Berdan, Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014): Chaps. 3-6.

Wednesday, July 22

Visiting Scholar: Frances F. Berdan: Discovering and Interpreting the Aztec World

Morning seminar: Aztec Art and Architecture
Reading:
Frances F. Berdan, Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014): Chap. 7.
Matos Moctezuma, Eduardo, The Great Temple of Tenochtitlan: Center and Periphery in the Aztec World, ed. Johanna Broda, Davíd Carrasco, & Eduardo Matos Moctezuma (University of California Press, 1987): Chap. 1, “The Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan: History and Interpretation,” pp. 15-60.

Afternoon seminar: the Aztec Worldview
Reading:
Frances F. Berdan, Aztec Archaeology and Ethnohistory (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2014): Chap. 8.

Optional reading:
León –Portilla, Miguel. Fifteen Poets of the Aztec World (University of Oklahoma Press, 1992): Part Two. Poets of Mexico-Tenochtitlan, pp. 147-185.
Clendinnen, Inga. Aztecs: An Interpretation (Cambridge University Press, 1991): Chaps. 5 and 6, pp. 141-173.

Thursday, July 23

Visiting Scholar: Frances F. Berdan: the Codex Mendoza

Morning seminar: Aztec History and the Tribute System of the Empire according to the Codex Mendoza
Reading:
From: The Codex Mendoza, ed. Frances F. Berdan and Patricia Rieff Anawalt (Univ. of California Press, 1993), Vol. 1: Elizabeth Boone, “The Aztec Pictorial History of the Codex Mendoza”; and Frances F. Berdan, “The Imperial Tribute Roll of the Codex Mendoza.” The Essential Codex Mendoza, ed. Frances F. Berdan and Patricia Rieff Anawalt (Univ. of California, 1997): pp. 3-25 & 29-141.

Also:

Consult The Codex Mendoza online: Part I, the History (Folios 2r - 16v); Part II, the Tribute (Folios 17v - 55r):
< https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/Discover/Search/-/?p=c+10,t+early mesoamerican,rsrs+0,rsps+100,fa+,so+ox%3Asort%5Easc,scids+,pid+2fea788e-2aa2-4f08-b6d9-648c00486220,vi+ >

Afternoon seminar: Daily Life: the Ethnographic section of the Codex Mendoza
Reading:
The Essential Codex Mendoza, ed. Frances F. Berdan and Patricia Rieff Anawalt (Univ. of California, 1997): pp.143- 237.
Carrasco, David, City of Sacrifice: The Aztec Empire and the Role of Violence in Civilization (Beacon Press, 1999): “ Introduction: Performing the City of Sacrifice,” pgs. 1-15; and Chap. 1, “City as Symbol in Aztec Thought: Some Clues from the Codex Mendoza,” pg. 15-48.

Also:

Consult The Codex Mendoza online: Part III, Daily Life (Folios 56v - 71r):
< Same URL as above >.

Friday, July 24

Visiting Scholar: Lori Boornazian Diel (Professor of Art History, Texas Christian University)

Morning seminar: An Overview of Aztec/Nahua Pictorial Histories: Form and Function
Reading:
N.B.: Consult “Institute List of Mexican Codices Accessible Online.”
Boone, Elizabeth H. Stories in Red and Black: Pictorial Histories of the Aztecs and Mixteca (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000): Chap. 3.
Diel, Lori B. “The Poetics and Politics of Aztec History.” In Thinking, Recording, and Writing History in the Ancient World, edited by Kurt A. Raaflaub, (Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley Blackwell, 2014): 372-390.
Umberger, Emily. “The Structure of Aztec History,” Archaeoastronomy 4.4 (1981): 10-18.

Optional Reading. Consult:

Boone, Elizabeth H. “Aztec Pictorial Histories: Records without Words.” In Writing Without Words: Alternative Literacies in Mesoamerica and the Andes, edited by Elizabeth H. Boone and Walter Mignolo, (Durham: Duke University Press, 1994): 50-76.
Robertson, Donald. Mexican Manuscript Painting of the Early Colonial Period (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1959).

Afternoon seminar: The Corpus of Aztec Pictorial Histories.
Reading:
Boone, Elizabeth H. Stories in Red and Black: Pictorial Histories of the Aztecs and Mixteca (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000): Chap. 8.
Diel, Lori B. Codex Mexicanus: A Guide to Life in Late Sixteenth-Century New Spain (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018): Chaps. 1 and 5.

Optional Reading:

Consult: Codex Mexicanus online at:
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b55005834g.r=mexicain?rk=214593;2
Consult: Tira de Tepechpan online at:
https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b55005968w.r=mexicain 20?rk=85837;2
Consult: Quiñones Keber, Eloise. The Codex Telleriano-Remensis: Ritual, Divina-tion, and History in a Pictorial Aztec History (Univ. of Texas Press, 1995).
Douglas, Eduardo de Jesus. “Figures of Speech: Pictorial History in the Quinatzin Map of about 1542.” Art Bulletin 85.2 (2003): 281-309.
Navarette, Federico. “The Path from Aztlan to Mexico: On Visual Narration in the Mesoamerican Codices.” Res 37 (2000): 31-48.

Saturday, July 25

Visiting Scholar: Lori Boornazian Diel

Morning seminar: Gender and Aztec Pictorial Histories
Reading:
Gillespie, Susan. The Aztec Kings: The Construction of Rulership in Mexica History (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1989: Chaps. 1 and 4.
Diel, Lori B. “Till Death Do Us Part: Unconventional Marriages as Aztec Political Strategy,” Ancient Mesoamerica 18.2 (2007): 259-272.

Optional Reading:

Carrasco, Pedro. “Royal Marriages in Ancient Mexico.” In Explorations in Ethnohistory: Indians of Central Mexico in the Sixteenth Century, edited by H.R. Harvey and Hanns J. Prem, (Univ. of New Mexico Press, 1984): 41-81.
Evans, Susan Toby. “Sexual Politics in the Aztec Palace: Public, Private, Profane.” Res 33 (1998): 167-183.

Townsend, Camilla. “Polygyny and the Divided Altepetl: The Tetzcocan Key to Preconquest Nahua Politics.” In Texcoco: Pre-Hispanic and Colonial Perspectives, edited by Jongsoo Lee and Galen Brokaw (University Press of Colorado, 2014): 93-116.

Afternoon seminar: Representations of the Conquest in Aztec Pictorial Histories
Reading:
Magaloni, Diana. “Visualizing the Nahua/Christian Dialogue: Images of the Conquest in Sahagún’s Florentine Codex and Their Sources.” In Sahagún at 500: Essays on the Quincentenary of the Birth of Fr. Bernardino de Sahagún, edited by John Frederick Schwaller. (Berkeley: Academy of American Franciscan History, 2003): 193-221. Kartunnen, Frances. “Rethinking Malinche.” In Indian Women of Early Mexico, edited by Susan Schroeder, Stephanie Wood, and Robert Haskett (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1997): 291-312.

Optional Reading:

Fernández-Armesto, Felipe. “Aztec Auguries and Memories of the Conquest of Mexico.” Renaissance Studies 6 (1992): 287-305.

And, looking ahead to week three, consult:

Wood, Stephanie. Transcending Conquest: Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2003.

Sunday, July 26 Day free for individual reading and activities

WEEK TWO

Monday, July 27

Visiting Scholar: Rolena Adorno (Sterling Professor of Spanish, Yale University)

Morning seminar: Cortés, Empire, and the Rule of Law
Reading:
Hernan Cortés, Letters from Mexico {1519-1526), trans. Anthony Pagden (Yale University Press, 1986): 8-74, 83-139.
J. H. Elliott, “The Mental World of Hernan Cortés,” in Spain and its World, 1500-1700, ed. by J. H. Elliott (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1989): 27-41.
Rolena Adorno. The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative (Yale University Press, 2007; 2014): Chaps. 4 and 5.

Afternoon seminar: Fray Bartolomé de las Casas’ Account of the Conquest of the Indies
Reading:
Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, trans. N. Griffin, intro. by A. Pagden (Penguin Books, 1992): 3-9, 42-80.
Rolena Adorno. The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative (Yale University Press, 2007; 2014): Chaps. 3 and 12.

Tuesday, July 28

Visiting Scholar: Rolena Adorno

Morning seminar: The Conquest and the Post-conquest Worlds of Bernal Díaz del Castillo”
Reading:
Bernal Diaz del Castillo, The Conquest of New Spain, trans. J.M. Cohen (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1985): 7-12, 14, 85-87, 166-88, 216-77, 293-307.
____ Handout selections, in English translation, from the Historia verdaderade la conquista de la Nueva Espana, that pertain to Cortés’s experiences as the Marques del Valle de Oaxaca and Bernal Díaz’s account of his experiences as encomendero and advocate (procurador) on behalf of himself and his peers before the Council of the Indies in Castile. Rolena Adorno, The Polemics of Possession in Spanish American Narrative (Yale University Press, 2007; 2014): Chaps. 6 and 7.

Afternoon seminar: “Mexica and Tlaxcalan views of Spanish conquest and Christian Evangelization”
Reading:
Miguel Leon-Portilla, ed. The Broken Spears: The Aztec Account of the Conquest of Mexico. Foreword by J. Jorge Klor de Alva (Boston: Beacon Press, 1992).
J. Jorge Klor de Alva, trans. “The Aztec-Spanish Dialogues (1524)”, Alcheringa 4.2 (1980): 52-193.

Wednesday, July 29

Visiting Scholar: Kevin Terraciano (Professor of History, Director of the Latin American Institute, Co-Chair Latin American Studies Graduate Program, UCLA)

Morning seminar: Indigenous Accounts mediated by Friars: Bernardino de Sahagún
Reading:
Mesoamerican Voices: Native Language Writings from Colonial Mexico, Yucatan, and Guatemala, ed. by Matthew Restall, Lisa Sousa, & Kevin Terraciano (Cambridge University Press, 2005): Chap. 3, sections 1 & 2.

Or:

We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico, ed. & txransl. by James Lockhart (Eugene, Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2004): Texts & Translations 1 & 2, pp. 48-273.

Afternoon seminar:
Reading:
Kevin Terraciano, “Reading Between the Lines of Book 12.” In The Florentine Codex: An Encyclopedia of the Nahua World in Sixteenth-Century Mexico, ed. Jeannette Peterson and Kevin Terraciano (University of Texas Press, 2019).
S. L. Cline, “Revisionist Conquest History: Sahagún’s Revised Book XII.” In The Work of Bernardin de Sahagun/ Pioneer Ethnographer of Sixteenth-Century Aztec Mexico, ed. J. Jorge Klor de Alva, H. B. Nicholson, and Eloise Quiñones-Keber (Institute for Mesoamerican Studies, SUNY-Albany; distributed by University of Texas Press, 1988): 93-106.

Thursday, July 30

Visiting Scholar: Kevin Terraciano

Morning seminar: Indigenous Accounts mediated by Friars: Diego Durán
Reading:
Fray Diego Durán, The History of the Indies of New Spain, Translated, Annotated, and with an Introduction by Doris Heyden [1964] (University of Oklahoma Press, 1994): Chaps. LXIX-LXXVIII (pp. 495-563), plus Appendix, “Durán’s Historia and the Crónica X,” pp. 565-577.

Optional reading:

Tzvetan Todorov, “Durán, or the Hybridization of Cultures,” in The Conquest of America/ the Question of the Other, Tr. Richard Howard (Harper Torchbooks, 1984): 202-218.

Afternoon seminar:
Reading:
Consult: Sahagún, Primeros Memoriales: http://bdmx.mx/documento/galeria/bernardino-sahagun-codices-matritenses/fo_06
Consult: Sahagún, The Florentine Codex: https://tecpaocelotl.livejournal.com/25254.html

or: https://www.wdl.org/en/item/10096/

Friday, July 31

Visiting Scholar: Jeanne Gillespie (Professor of Spanish and Native American Studies, University of Southern Mississippi)

Morning seminar: The Republic of Tlaxcala and its Colonial Legacy
Reading:
Fargar, Lane, Richard Blanton, Vernice Y. Heredia Espinosa. “Egalitarian Ideology and Political Power in Prehispanic Central Mexico: the Case of Tlaxcallan.” Latin American Antiquity, Vol. 21.3 (September 2010): 227-251.
Gillespie, Jeanne. Blood, Water, Power and Bugs a la Tlaxcalteca.” In The Body, Subject & Subjected, ed. Debra Andrist (Sussex, UK: Sussex Press, 2016).
____”The Codex of Tlaxcala: Indigenous Petitions and the Discourse of Heterarchy.” HIPERTEXTO 13 (January, 2011): 59-74.
Wake, Eleanor. “Codex Tlaxcala: New Insights and New Questions.” Estudios de Cultural Nahuatl 33 (2002) 91-140.
Jeanne Gillespie, Saints and Warriors/ Tlaxcallan Perspectives on the Conquest of Tenochtitlan (University Press of the South, 2004): Chaps. 3 & 4.

Afternoon seminar: The Poetics and Politics of Xochiyaoyotl (Flowery War)
Reading:
Guilhem Olivier, “Why Give Birth to Enemies? The Warrior Aspects of the Aztec Goddess Tlazolteotl-Ixcuina.” RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, No. 65/66 (2014/ 2015): 55-71. < https://www.jstor.org/stable/24871243 >
Jeanne Gillespie, “Blood, Water, Popes, and Blowguns: Language and Poetics in Contact in Colonial Mexico,” Paper prepared for the Latin American Studies Association Congress 2018, Barcelona, Spain, May 2018.
Jeanne Gillespie, Saints and Warriors/ Tlaxcallan Perspectives on the Conquest of Tenochtitlan (University Press of the South, 2004): Chaps. 5 & 6.
Jeanne Gillespie, “Establishing World Order in Mesoamerica: the Codex Mendoza and the Lienzo de Tlaxcala,” Indiana Journal of Hispanic Literatures 13.1 (Fall 1998): 93-99.

Saturday, August 1

Visiting Scholar: Amber Brian (Director, Latin American Studies Program, University of Iowa)

Morning seminar: Tezcoco Historian Fernando de Alva Cortés Ixtlilxóchitl
Reading:
Alva Ixtlilxochitl, Fernando de. The Native Conquistador: Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Account of the Conquest of New Spain. Translated and edited by Amber Brian, Bradley Benton and Pablo García Loaeza (Penn State University Press, 2015).
Adorno, Rolena. “The Indigenous Ethnographer: the ‘Indio ladino’ as Historian and Cultural Mediator.” In Implicit Understandings: Observing, Reporting, and Reflection on the Encounters between Europeans and Other Peoples in the Early Modern Era, edited by Stewart Schwartz (Cambridge University Press, 1994): 378-402.

Afternoon seminar: Native Knowledge and Mestizo Historiography
Reading:
Brian, Amber. 2016. “Configuring Native Knowledge: Seventeenth-Century Mestizo Historiography.” In Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Native Archive and the Circulation of Knowledge in Colonial Mexico, ed. Amber Brian (Nashville: Vanderbilt, 2016): 77-107.
Kellogg, Susan. “Alva Ixtlilxochitl’s Marina and Other Women of Conquest.” In Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy, edited by Galen Brokaw and Jongsoo Lee (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2016): 209-234.
Villella, Peter. “The Last Acolhua: Alva Ixtlilxochitl and Elite Native Historio-graphy in Early New Spain,” Colonial Latin American Review 23.1 (2014): 18-36.

Sunday, August 2 Day free for individual reading and activities  

WEEK THREE

Monday, August 3

Visiting Scholar: Susan Schroeder (Scholes Professor of colonial Latin American History emerita, Tulane University)

Morning seminar: The Meanings of “Conquest” according to Chimalpahin and Tezozomoc
Reading:
David E. Taváerez, “Reclaiming the Conquest: An Assessment of Chimalpahin’s Modifications to la conquista de Mexico.” In Chimalpahin’s Conquest: A Nahua Historian’s Rewriting of Francisco López de Gómara’s La conquista de Mexico, edited by Susan Schroeder, Anne J. Cruz, Critián Roa-de-le-Carrera, and David E. Taváerez (Stanford University Press, 2010): 17-34.
Susan Schroeder, “Introduction: the Genre of Conquest Studies,” in Indian Conquistadores: Indigenous Allies in the Conquest of Mesoamerica, ed. Laura E. Matthew and Michel R. Oudijk (Univ. of Oklahoma Press, 2007: pp. 5-27.
Consult We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. James Lockhart, editor and translator (Wipf & Stock Publishers, 1993; 2004), esp. Book XII of the Florentine Codex (pp. 48- 255).

Afternoon seminar: Chimalpahin and Tezozomoc in Context
Reading:
Codex Chimalpahin, by Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin, translated and edited by Arthur J. O. Anderson and Susan Schroeder, 2 Vols. (University of Oklahoma Press, 1997): Vol. 1, pp. 27-65, and Vol. 2, pp. 19-33.

Also:

Consult: Peter Villella, Indigenous Elites and Creole Identity in Colonial Mexico, 1500-1800 (Cambridge University Press, 2016): 1-148.
Consult: Elizabeth Hill Boone, Louise M. Burkhart, David Tavárez, Painted Words/ Nahua Catholicism, Politics, and Memory in the Atzaqualco Pictorial Cate-chism. Dumbarton Oaks Pre-Columbian Art and Archaeology Studies Series 39. Washington: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 2017.

Tuesday, August 4

Visiting Scholar: Barbara Mundy (Professor of Art History, Fordham University — Rose Hill campus)

Morning seminar: From Tenochtitlan to Mexico City
Reading:
Barbara Mundy, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City. Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Series in Latin American and Latino Art and Culture. (University of Texas Press, 2015): Chaps. 1 & 5.

Afternoon seminar:
Reading:
“Extract from the Annals of Tlatelolco,” in We People Here: Nahuatl Accounts of the Conquest of Mexico. James Lockhart, editor and translator (Wipf & Stock Publishers, 1993; 2004): 257- 275.
Barbara Mundy, “Mapping the Aztec Capital: the 1524 Nuremberg Map of Tenochtitlan, Its Sources and Meanings,” Imago Mundi, 50 (1998): 1-22.

Wednesday, August 5

Visiting Scholar: Dana Leibsohn (Alice Pratt Brown Chair of Art, Smith College)

Morning seminar: Testimony from Cuauhtinchan: Mapa 2 de Cuauhtinchan
Reading:
Boone, Elizabeth Hill. “The House of the Eagle.” In Cave, City, and Eagle’s Nest: An Interpretive Journey through the Mapa de Cuauhtinchan No. 2, Eds. Davíd Carrasco and Scott Sessions (University of New Mexico Press, 2007): 27-47.
Leibsohn, Dana. “Seeing In Situ: The Mapa de Cuauhtinchan No. 2.” In Cave, City, and Eagle’s Nest: An Interpretive Journey through the Mapa de Cuauhtinchan No. 2, Eds. Davíd Carrasco and Scott Sessions (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2007): 389-425.

Afternoon seminar: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico kept their history alive.
Reading:
Townsend, Camilla. “Old Stories in New Letters,” In Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept their History Alive. (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2017): 16-52.

Thursday, August 6

Visiting Scholar: Dana Leibsohn

Morning Seminar: Testimony from Cuauhtinchan: the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca
Reading:
Leibsohn, Dana, Script and Glyph: Pre-Hispanic History, Colonial Bookmaking and the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca (Washington, DC, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library, 2009): Chap. 1, “Subjects of History,” pp. 12-37.

Afternoon seminar: the Paintings of the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca
Reading:
Leibsohn, Dana, Script and Glyph: Pre-Hispanic History, Colonial Bookmaking and the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca (Washington, DC, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library, 2009): “Appendix 1: Major Paintings of the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca,” pp. 105-167.

Also:

Consult the Historia Tolteca-Chichimeca online at:
< https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84559448/f1.image >.

Friday, August 7

Visiting Scholar Stephanie Wood (Director, Wired Humanities Projects; Senior Editor, Oxford University Press for “Digital reseources” section of the Oxford Research Encyclopedia on Latin American History)

Morning seminar: Nahua views of Spanish colonial Mexico
Reading:
Stephanie Wood, Transcending Conquest/ Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico (University of Oklahoma Press, 2003): Chaps. 1 & 2.

Afternoon seminar: An anguished report, and a proud alliance
Reading:
Stephanie Wood, Transcending Conquest/ Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico (University of Oklahoma Press, 2003): Chaps. 3 & 4.

Saturday, August 8

Visiting Scholar Stephanie Wood

Morning seminar: Nahua and Nahuatl studies online
Reading:
Consult Stephanie Wood’s digital collections in secure open-source databases:
“The Mapas Project”: < https://enl.uoregon.edu/ >
“Early Nahuatl Library”: < https://mapas.uoregon.edu/ >

Afternoon seminar: Concluding Roundtable with Project Directors

Sunday, August 9 Day of departure; individual arrangements.


Aditional Resources for Future Reference

Restall, Matthew, When Montezuma Met Cortés: The True Story of the Meeting that Changed History. ECCO An Imprint of Harper Collins Publishers, 2018.

Leibsohn, Dana, Script and Glyph: Pre-Hispanic History, Colonial Bookmaking and the Historia Tolteca-Chichemeca. Dumbarton Oaks Research Library Collection, Washington, DC, 2009.

Susan Schroeder, ed. The Conquest All Over Again: Nahuas and Zapotecs Thinking, Writing, and Painting Spanish Colonialism. Academic Press, 2011.

Wood, Stephanie, Transcending Conquest: Nahua Views of Spanish Colonial Mexico. University of Oklahoma Press, 2003.

Mundy, Barbara E. The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, The Life of Mexico City. University of Texas Press, 2015.

Robertson, Donald. Mexican Manuscript Painting of the Early Colonial Period (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1959).

Townsend, Camilla, Annals of Native America: How the Nahuas of Colonial Mexico Kept Their History Alive. Oxford University Press, 2017.

Brienen, Rebecca P. and M. A. Jackson (eds.), Invasion and Transformation: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Conquest of Mexico. University of Colorado Press, 2008.

Gruzinski, Serge, The Conquest of Mexico. Polity Press, 1993.

Todorov, Tzvetan, The Conquest of America: The Question of the Other. Harper & Row, 1984.

Hassig, Ross, Mexico and the Spanish Conquest, 2nd ed. University of Oklahoma Press, 2006.

Clendinnen, Inga, Aztecs. Cambridge University Press, 1991.

León-Portilla, Miguel, The Aztec Image of Self and Society: An Introduction to Nahua Culture. University of Utah Press, 1992.

León-Portilla, Miguel, ed. Fifteen Poets of the Aztec World. University of Oklahoma Press, 1992.

León-Portilla, Miguel, Bernardino de Sahagún: First Anthropologist. University of Oklahoma Press, 2002.





“Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.”